Book Review: Titanic in Picture Postcards

With yesterday being the 100th anniversary of the Titanic sinking, today’s book review is Titanic in Picture Postcards by Robert McDougall and Robin Gardiner. This is a good book because there is a good amount of information that goes along with images and postcards of the Titanic and other relevant ships in the material, it is not just a picture book. The book starts out with the history of the White Star Line, then the beginning of Titanic’s voyage, hitting the iceberg and all the warnings Titanic received before it happened, and the aftermath.

One of the most interesting things I learned while reading this was that J.P. Morgan purchased the White Star Line in 1902 and made it part of his International Mercantile Marine Company. I had heard before that he was supposed to be on Titanic himself, but this book explains that he cancelled his booking at the last minute, along with all the Egyptian artifacts that were supposed to be added to his New York collection. Had J.P. Morgan been on board, he would have been the richest man. John Jacob Astor ended up being the wealthiest man on Titanic and sadly died when he was refused a seat on a lifeboat next to his wife.

This is definitely a worthwhile read if Titanic interests you. There are a decent number of images shown throughout the book of Titanic and the crew members.

P.S.- The date on this post says April 17th, but it is actually the 16th as I am writing this! Titanic sank on April 14th into the 15th, 1912.

Advertisements
This entry was posted in Books and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s