Jackson Park

Jackson Park is just one of many parks in Chicago. What makes it special however is the fact that it was the site for the 1893 Columbian Exposition. Today, the Museum of Science and Industry in Jackson Park is a remaining building from the fair that originally was the Fine Arts Palace, renamed to the Field Museum of Natural History before it’s current name today.

The Field Museum of Natural History. Postmarked in 1914. The description on the back reads: “Jackson Park is located on the south side, extending 1 1-8 miles along Lake Michigan from 56th to 67th Streets. It has a total area of 543 acres. It contains nearly 3 miles of drives, numerous walks and bridle paths , 107 acres of artificial lakes, and 15315 square yards of out-door gymnasiums. It is the site of the Worlds Columbian Exposition and contains a number of its landmarks, among them the Field Museum of Natural History.”

Another relic from the exposition is a smaller version of Daniel Chester French’s Statue of the Republic which was at the foot of the Court of Honor during the fair. While I do not have a postcard of the statue in my collection, the one below is available for sale in my Delcampe store.

Rest House and Boulevard, postmarked 1919.

The Anchorage and La Rabida. The La Rabida Sanitarium was for sick children, and an original building from the exposition, but destroyed by fire in 1922. La Rabida Children’s Hospital exists on the South Side and is in operation today.

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One Response to Jackson Park

  1. Pingback: Museum of Science and Industry | Moore's Postcard Museum

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